Friday, July 31, 2009

FCC investigates Apple, AT&T for Google Voice app rejection

Apple's decision to reject Google Voice apps for the iPhone -- possibly at AT&T's request -- has prompted an FCC investigation into the anti-competitive nature of the move.

Read the full story here, from AppleInsider

Apple Nips iPhone Attack In The Bug

The company patches a text message bug in its iPhone OS and downplays a high-profile hack.

Read the full story here, from Forbes.com News

Windows 7 on MacBook Pro: Nice, but still has poor battery life

Windows 7, like Windows Vista and XP drains battery really fast on Intel-based Mac laptop.

Read the full story here, from CNET News.com

iPhone apps: Roadee, iSpeak, Air Cam Live Video

Roadee ($2) is a navigation tool which uses maps from OpenStreetMap.com. The application can provide directions to any location and includes a search function for finding points of interest in the area. Aside from directions Roadee also provides users with their current speed and can speak directions in English. Additional support for additional languages is planned for future releases....



Read the full story here, from MacNN | The Macintosh News Network

Three astronomy apps for the iPhone

With the recent news about outer space, it's easy to get excited over space exploration. Roman Loyola looks at three space-related iPhone apps to fuel your newfound interest.



Read the full story here, from Macworld

Liberian rape case tears US community apart

The hundreds of Liberian families who sought refuge in Arizona fled a West African civil war that piled the unthinkable upon the more routine horrors of conflict, many at the hands of children.

In Phoenix the families thought they had put all that behind them but in recent days they, and much of the rest of Arizona's capital, have grappled with what appears to be a terrible crime apparently made worse by an almost incomprehensible response.

It was bad enough that four boys, one only nine years old, allegedly lured an eight-year-old girl in to a shed with a promise of chewing gum and took turns raping and assaulting her. But what followed has left Phoenix residents and authorities perplexed and angry.

When the police arrived, the girl's mother told them to take her daughter away and not bring her back because she brought shame on the family by saying she was raped.

"Nothing has happened to my daughter. Nobody has touched my daughter," said the mother who cannot be named in order to protect the identity of her daughter.

The child's older sister said she only has herself to blame.

"I said to her: It's not good for you to be following guys because you're still little," she said. "She always bring trouble."

The girl has been taken in to care.

The police say there is evidence of rape. They allege that the boys held the girl down and took turns to "brutally sexually assault" her for about 15 minutes. The police were called when the girl was found screaming and with her clothes torn.

Four boys who were found running from the scene have been charged with kidnapping and sexual assault. Steven Tuopeh, 14, is being prosecuted as an adult. The others, aged from nine to 13, will be tried in juvenile court.

Now the mother is calling for her daughter's alleged attackers to be released saying that it is an internal matter within the close-knit refugee community of about 1,200 Liberians who fled their country's civil wars, notoriously brutal even by African standards, but cannot escape their legacy.

The conflicts were marked by indiscriminate killing, mutilation and rape - and the recruitment of child soldiers who were responsible for all three often while high on drugs or alcohol. Children were also frequently the victims of rape. Many others witnessed killings, sometimes of parents. Before they made it to America some were struggling by in refugee camps.

Lasana Kamara, who helped found a support organisation for Liberian refugees, the Arizona Mandingo Association, said that a culture of violence continues to grip children from the community.

"The families have been traumatised, the children have been traumatised. Sometimes they have seen things. Sometimes their parents were killed. The violence they have seen is part of them. They form gangs according to where they are from in Liberia," said Kamara, who fled the west African state in 1992 and now works as a detention officer at a local sheriff's jail.

"That war was total destruction. With all they have seen, then coming here, it's very difficult. It's going to take a very long time for the children to really get themselves together. Every month we have meetings and tell the kids don't do this. But sometimes it's beyond control."

Some of the children were too young to have witnessed the conflict first hand, but they are still drawn in to its aftermath, particularly with attitudes toward violence and rape.

Sexual violence in Liberia may have been widespread but it was barely taken seriously. The victims were often made to feel responsible. Rape was outlawed in Liberia only in 2006.

That law was passed by the country's first female president, Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf, who has sought to remove the stigma by revealing that she was the victim of attempted rape during the war. Johnson-Sirleaf criticised the girl's family.



Read the full story here, from Guardian Unlimited

Life not as we know it

From hyper-real glaciers to chomping plesiosaurs to snarling dogs - the natural world in art was transformed by theories of evolution. Richard Fortey on painters' responses to Darwin

John Collier's 1883 life-size portrait of the great man greets the visitor in the main gallery of the Fitzwilliam Museum exhibition Endless Forms: Charles Darwin, Natural Science and the Visual Arts. Darwin is dressed in a dark cape. His sober hat is held in his hand as if he were just about to leave on a walk around the grounds of Down House to ponder some new theory. The famous brow beetles with a vengeance. Darwin's brooding presence combines deep seriousness with not a little sadness: he has seen into so much, and yet his wisdom seems to have brought him some regrets. Perhaps he is thinking of his daughter Annie, who died at the age of 10. This is the scientist as icon, a sage for the godless.

As an old man Darwin sat for many portraits, including photographs. We know every hair on his beard. Probably no other major thinker has been so well documented. In this bicentenary year his prolific correspondence is available on the web; his notebooks have been annotated; his books have been reprinted. He has figured on the £10 note. His influence extends just about everywhere, and that includes the visual arts. The Fitzwilliam has brought together an eclectic collection of visual images - scientific, fine art, cartoons, even kitsch - to illustrate Darwin's development, and how his ideas influenced others. The irony is that, unlike many of his contemporaries, Darwin was a lousy artist.

Darwin grew up in a free-thinking liberal-intellectual milieu, one that was full of natural history; after all, his grandfather Erasmus wrote extensively and in occasionally passable verse on the topic. The portrayal of the young Darwin as a kind of Hooray Henry huntin' type is hardly accurate. He was mad about collecting rare beetles from an early age, and some of his guidebooks are on show at the Fitzwilliam. He was also exceptionally lucky with his mentors in Cambridge. Unlike Darwin, John Stevens Henslow could draw with delicate accuracy - his flower paintings are a delight - and he initiated his young charge into the pleasures of geology. What would students today make of hand-painted aids to learning? By comparison, Darwin's attempts at coloured geological sections from the Beagle voyage seem clunky at best.

The artistic ante is raised soon after the encounter with the Collier portrait. This is Darwin after On the Origin of Species, when his ideas had percolated into Victorian society. There are some revelations here. Joseph Wolf drew and painted animals with great accuracy and conviction. No longer picturesque or allegorical, nor mere furry or feathered objects destined to be hunted by humans, these animals could play out their own dramas in "the struggle for existence". The artist casts his cold eye on these products of evolution, and renders them accurately. Ptarmigan are white in winter and mottled grey in summer, not on a whim of the creator, but as a contribution to disguise and to the successful rearing of offspring. Drama does not have to be fed into life painting as a kind of human seasoning: it is the stuff of nature itself. An extraordinary large painting by Abbott Thayer renders a snake concealed to perfection among leaves. Thayer's notions were used for camouflaging tanks in the first world war. Imitation and mimicry are everywhere in the natural world, just as in art. It's a survival technique.

The accurate rendition of nature was also a theme developed by John Ruskin. He revelled in truly representing rock formations, dappled with lichens and softened by time. A superbly rendered geological watercolour reminds us what a skilled craftsman he was. He is hung alongside other Victorians who went in for a kind of ecstatic hyper-reality. John Brett's painting of a glacier is almost frighteningly literal and three-dimensional. The viewer feels he might be able to break off a piece of aquamarine ice and drop it in a drink. A famous and rather wonderful painting of Pegwell Bay by William Dyce shows a sea shore on which every pebble is delineated. The whole is suffused with an eerie pale light, which makes the landscape seem more like a first cousin to one of Dalí's rather than Ruskin's. Over-dressed girls seem to be taking an interest in geology. But in the sky, very tiny, is a comet. This is the portrayal of a particular moment in 1858, when Donati's comet appeared. So not only is every stone an accurate stone, but the time is also precisely located. This is verisimilitude gone mad. Dyce was a high church Anglican, and no friend of Darwinism: the comet was there to remind us of a higher order. Ruskin, too, came to abhor what he saw as the arid precepts of natural selection. So these pictures occupy an ambiguous place in the exhibition: reaction rather than homage.

"Nature red in tooth and claw" is certainly the appropriate phrase to describe reconstructions of prehistoric seascapes. In Jurassic-era Dorset everything seems to be vigorously eating everything else. Ichthyosaurs grab plesiosaurs by the neck. The scene is illustrated by a huge and rather hideous daub by Robert Farren, copied from an original sketch by the first director of the Geological Survey, Henry de la Beche. Apparently the artist demurred at portraying the plesiosaur shitting itself with fear, as it had in the original. These vigorously chomping imaginary scenes have a tradition beginning long before the Origin. The age of "sea monsters" had been the subject of popular excitement since the 1830s. In those days the extinct reptiles could seem comfortably and thrillingly distant, emblems of a blasted former world. After the notion of evolution gained general recognition, the thread of life extended continuously into these strange worlds. Who knows, we might even see our own ancestors somewhere in these bloody scenes. I was much less convinced by the inclusion of a worthy but pedestrian painting of a poor family (entitled On Strike), supposedly representing "Struggle in Victorian society". We know that Darwin took a liberal stance on social issues, but I doubt very much that he had the industrial proletariat in the front of his mind when he wrote of the struggle for existence. The inexorable mathematics of Malthus on population growth was nearer the mark.

In 1872 Darwin published The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals, a book that broke new ground and confirmed the continuity between the human and the animal kingdoms. It was a lateral-thinking confirmation of all that he had claimed about common ancestry in his earlier works. We are one with the dingo in baring our teeth in anger; we are one with the chimpanzee when we look down in the mouth. Darwin's emotion book provides an excuse to display a whole series of paintings in this exhibition, many by Sir Edwin Landseer, a favourite of Queen Victoria. His pre-Origin oil Dead Stags shows great males dead after combat, and already a fox and an eagle are slipping into sight to enjoy the fruits of others' misfortune. It is too dark to be sentimental, and technically excellent.

But other Landseer paintings play on the commonality of those "expressions of emotion", though most precede Darwin's 1872 book. Never has so much talent been expended on such mawkish results. Dogs are the actors in genre scenes. Be It Ever So Humble, There's No Place Like Home features a pleading mutt lurking outside a kennel, which is clearly a substitute for some highlander's bothy. The eyes invite the viewer to pat the dog on the head, or else send it packing, depending on your susceptibility to canine charm. If you prefer your dogs re-enacting stories from the classics, there is a large picture, Alexander and Diogenes, with the grumpy wiseacre stuck in his barrel ignoring the famous prince. Then there is a self-portrait from 1865, in which Landseer is flanked by two snooty-looking dogs who have found him wanting in several important respects. Just in case you missed the point the title spells it out: The Connoisseurs.

Any claim that these paintings anticipate Darwin's more scientific approach to expression of emotions in dogs and humans (or apes for that matter) is more than the art really deserves. These dogs are, in truth, human beings dressed up in doggy drag. Darwin himself commented that Landseer's portrayal of aggression in Alexander and Diogenes was entirely inaccurate. The paintings are only a couple of steps away from Louis Wain's manically humanoid cats swaggering around snooker tables and smoking cigars. If the visitor wants to see accurate portrayals of dogs snarling or grovelling, then the drawings by Wolf in the same room are much nearer the mark. Totally unsentimentalised, these dogs show the Big Bad Wolf lurking within, and point up both the similarities and the differences between canines and ourselves and our near relatives. In the end Darwin approved Briton Rivière as the illustrator for his expression book, but from the examples shown here Rivière was not entirely free of a tendency to over-egg the human qualities of his animal subjects. The reaction of contemporary artists to Darwin's observations on animal expressions is currently being explored at an exhibition at the Natural History Museum. It seems that the question of what faces are really telling us still resonates long after Landseer's animals have been confined to Valentine cards.

Some of the paintings on show at the Fitzwilliam are frankly weird. GF Watts is represented by a painting entitled simply Evolution. The whole thing is enveloped in a kind of brownish fog. A strange earth-mother figure looks away from what we must assume are her offspring, a crowd of diminutive and almost faceless creatures that resemble some of the more disturbing aliens from recent episodes of Doctor Who. Odder still are a series of lithographs, Les Origines, by the symbolist French artist Odilon Redon. As they almost used to say on Star Trek, it's evolution, but not as we know it. A nasty furry humanoid with a huge eye in its forehead has "evolved" in one of Redon's visions. This is evolution without its underlying constraint, which a zoologist recognises in the principle of homology. This militates against the evolution of a cyclopean eye in a vertebrate, just as it would mean that angels cannot have both wings and arms. Redon's version of evolution results in creatures as fantastical as any medieval bestiary with its one-legged sciapods and flying quadripedal hippogryphs. The lithographs are a fascinating set, and show that some artists have taken from Darwin just what they wanted.

This brings us back to the image of the sage of Down. There is an interesting comparison to be made between those portrayals of the bearded biologist and old-master paintings of aged saints, such as Caravaggio's St Jerome. You could almost cut out Darwin's head, Photoshop it into the appropriate painting and it might fool you for a second. There seems to be a need for such images celebrating the wisdom of distinguished old age. Darwin has become almost like a saint for the sceptic; his notebooks have become secular relics. An excellent exhibition on Darwin the geologist, around the corner at the Sedgwick Museum, exhibits the rocks that he collected as he travelled the world in the Beagle. Visitors trot around Down House to inspect the "worm stone" (Darwin used it in a long-term experiment on earthworms) with the reverence reserved elsewhere for bits of the true cross. The Fitzwilliam exhibition gives us much to enjoy - there's a sumptuous catalogue by Diana Donald and Jane Munro - and tells us much about how Darwin's ideas soaked into our visual consciousness; and I have not even mentioned the plant drawings.



Read the full story here, from Guardian Unlimited

Like St Tropez before Bardot

Laid-back Marseillan can't claim to have the celeb clientele, glam bars and designer shops of its famous Riviera cousin, but that's why it's special

Sex-kitten starlets are thin on the sun-seared ground. So are €6,000 cotton beach dresses with Mongolian fur trim, Lamborghini Gallardos ostentatiously parked in front of harbourside cafes, and gin-palace superyachts. And you certainly won't see estate agents with details of stratospherically pricey villas in French, English and Russian.

Yet the petite port of Marseillan on the Languedoc coast, kissing a Mediterranean lagoon east of Béziers, has an undeniable frisson of St Tropez. Not the 2009 Riviera honeypot oozing bling, Eurotrash and traffic, but the serene isolated fishing village that first attracted artists and writers in the late 19th century, and then Bardot and the jet set in the 1950s.

As elsewhere in the south of France, looks count. While no doppelgänger, Marseillan shares strands of scenic DNA with its more famous Côte d'Azur counterpart. The views across its dazzling turquoise water to the hillside rooftops of Sète are reminiscent of St Tropez's to Grimaud and Sainte-Maxime. And both ports have excellent beaches a couple of miles outside town - although you've far less chance of being hit by a wayward Cristal cork around Marseillan plage.

But it's the town's protected 17th-century harbour that really captures the early Riviera vibe. Low-level houses laced with wrought-iron balconies and splattered with flowers swaddle a channel that jiggles with small boats and yachts, with a left bank of thriving restaurants and cafes.

And now unpretentious, laid-back Marseillan has some seriously stylish new accommodation. Port Rive Gauche, a converted 19th-century wine storehouse (booming trade spawned several monumental cellars near the waterfront) has two-bedroom apartments with balconies and terraces bombarded with startling lagoon light - all whites and light greys with beams, limed wood floors, and artfully distressed furniture. The little touches - antique dressmakers' dummies to hang clothes, old trunks and French words spelt out in jumbo metallic letters - are guaranteed to induce serious interior design envy.

So far, so chic. But despite its cool contemporary mood, the development - the only hotel near the harbour - seems to slip easily into Marseillan life. It doesn't appear to be an early sign of St Tropez-isation. The port's holiday trump card, after all, is its low-key charm and authentic local activities. It's why I found myself on the water with Jean-Claude Caumil. The ludicrously healthy retiree offers boat rides around the Bassin de Thau but shows little evidence of brutal commercialisation. His afternoon trip costs just €8pp.

It wasn't just excellent value, it was also fascinating. The massive lagoon has more than 700 Mediterranean species, including seahorses, and lies at the eastern end of the Canal du Midi, the 240km Unesco world heritage site.

"Do you want Toulouse or Bordeaux?" asked Jean-Claude, as we dissected its narrow entrance, nosing alongside the abandoned rusting hull of the Louisdaky from Cape Town.

Like the best travel, it's the quirky surprises, rather than the well-known show-stoppers, that hit the high notes. After passing the famed Les Glénans sailing club, where you ring a bell to summon a water taxi across the canal, Jean-Claude turned back to the lagoon, floored the engine and made a gesture of an elderly jockey whipping a horse. We bounced across the water like a giant Space Hopper, windsurfers and kitesurfers trailing in our wake.

After anchoring we spear-fished - I've never seen dorado laugh quite so brazenly - and snorkelled in crystal-clear shallows through waving seagrass. But best of all we simply slumped in the boat, let the sun freckle our faces and talked about nothing and everything. "I miss some things about work," mused Jean-Claude, who swapped his nearby hotel for 364 days a year on the water. "It had a nightclub and 250-cover restaurant. But it's good to relax."

He appears to have it nailed. And he's not alone. Locals around Marseillan have turned relaxation, lubricated with decent wine and fresh seafood, into an art form. A few hours later, I'm outside a white-walled, red-roofed chateau, sipping rosé and shooting the breeze with the owners, Pierre and Marie-Christine Fabre de Roussac. Tucked into magnificent towering trees, Domaine de la Bellonette is one of several grand estates lining the Bassin's north shore.

It offers spacious rooms with period furniture and a recently converted studio, but I was there for a major foodie treat: the local speciality of brazucade - a mussel barbecue with shellfish straight out of the briny.

In the past, when fennel was as common as nettles, chefs would cover the crustaceans with a generous blanket of the herb, before torching it to generate a steaming scented infusion. When the shells popped, it was job done. Ours was a tad more mainstream, with mussels cooked over glowing wood embers, but it still beat the hell out of burgers and chicken wings, particularly with its side-serving of zingingly fresh oysters. "I once made a 12m-long brazucade," said Pierre, casually opening another Languedoc wine. "It was no particular occasion. Just pleasure. Why not? We are French. We are Gaulois."

And also, Pierre, because you don't have to cook on a £20 B&Q barbie. But it's hard to disagree with the south-west joie de vivre. A couple more wines and I was seriously considering relocating.

Spend any time in Marseillan and you're constantly pulled back to the Bassin de Thau. All life swirls around, on or underneath it.

It's why I headed east along the shore to Medi Thau. It sounds like a centre for genetic engineering. And in a sense it is - only for oysters, not humans. The family firm has revolutionised the farming of the acclaimed crustaceans that thrive on the lagoon's phytoplankton.

Instead of submerging them on ropes for 12-18 months' growth, Medi Thau's solar-powered lifts regularly pull them out of the briny for hours, sometimes days, at a time. The result is that, rather than endlessly gorging, the critters are forced to keep their mouths closed to retain water - a mini workout.

"We make them suffer a little," says fisherman and directeur général Florent Tarbouriech, as we cruise around the sun-dappled oyster beds. "It makes them stronger, more muscular, more fleshy."

The tubby, plump beauties are up to 17% bigger than normal, fit to grace dining tables in Venice, Hong Kong and Shanghai. They also have a suntan: exposure to ultra-violet rays gives the shells a delicate rose blush and the name Pink Diamond.

But in Marseillan you don't need to splash a second mortgage at a flash restaurant. Medi Thau serves the super-sized aphrodisiacs in its straw-roofed shack, dripping with geraniums and surrounded by old fishing nets. The Pink Diamonds are extraordinary, more like steaks than oysters, with an addictive sweet aftertaste.

"All this just by lifting them out of the water," says Florent, as he prizes open another fleshy specimen. "C'est trés jolie. C'est incroyable." Which, worryingly, is exactly what director Roger Vadim and many others said about Brigitte Bardot in her 1950s St Tropez heyday.

But while Pink Diamonds are another recent development guaranteed to put Marseillan on the food and travel map, the small port seems more than capable of retaining its unhurried, sunny, bling-free charm.



Read the full story here, from Guardian Unlimited

Apple Releases iPhone OS 3.0.1 to Fix SMS Exploit

Apple has released iPhone OS 3.0.1 to fix a SMS exploit discovered by security researchers

Read the full story here, from iClarified - Apple News

Games: Crazy Monkey Spin Goes Bananas on the App Store

Digital Chocolate's latest iPhone game, Crazy Monkey Spin, was released Friday. It challenges players to swing through 50 levels in five environments – including the Antarctic and an aquarium – as they save captured zoo animals and grab bananas for power-ups.

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Read the full story here, from The Mac Observer

Tatsunoko Vs. Capcom will have 3 to 4 new characters, WiiSpeak support not confirmed, online play being worked on, and any sequel would most likely hit Wii

A portion of a Siliconera interview with Ryota Niitsuma, Producer of Tatsunoko vs. Capcom… S: What can you tell us about these new characters? Are they going to be split evenly between the Tatsunoko and Capcom sides? RN: In the end we want to have a good balance between the Tatsunoko side and the Capcom side, [...]


Sponsored Topics: iPhone - Palm Pre - Sprint Nextel - Apple -

Read the full story here, from Go Nintendo

Free on iTunes: Time Jumpers, The Colony, textPlus and More

In this week's installment of Free on iTunes, Vern Seward looks at Stan Lee's Time Jumpers, The Colony, and the iPhone app, textPlus.

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Read the full story here, from The Mac Observer

Opinion: Farewell, Shake

The video world has been buzzing about the unheralded demise of Apple's Shake. Here's a remembrance from someone who was on the Shake Train from the very beginning.



Read the full story here, from Macworld

Take Screenshots with Your iPhone

Capturing screenshots from any application or from the home screen is easy on the iPhone.




Read the full story here, from PC Magazine Office Tips and Solutions

Security: iPhone 3.0.1 Patches SMS Vulnerability

"Receiving a maliciously crafted SMS message may lead to an unexpected service interruption or arbitrary code execution."

Read the full story here, from MacInTouch

Find the tweeter next door

If you're looking to find some local tweeters, there are Web tools and iPhone apps that will help you do it.

Read the full story here, from CNET News.com

Citrix to Bring Receiver Technology to Android-Based Devices

Citrix Systems, which also offers its Receiver technology to users of Apples iPhone and RIM BlackBerry smartphone, is now looking to bring those capabilities to mobile devices running Googles Android operating system. Receiver lets mobile device users access their Microsoft Windows applications anywhere.
- Citrix Systems is expanding its presence in the mobile space. At its iForum Singapore event, which ran the week of July 27, Citrix officials showed off an early version of its Receiver product for mobile devices based on Googles Android operating system. The Receiver for Android product will grow ...

Read the full story here, from eWEEK Technology News

Review: SimplyTweet 2.0 for iPhone

The latest version of this Twitter client gets some needed improvements while also adding support for push notifications. But some flaws remain.



Read the full story here, from Macworld

iPhone 3.0.1 update patches SMS flaw

Apple on Friday released iPhone 3.0.1, which fixes the SMS vulnerability demonstrated by security researchers earlier this week.



Read the full story here, from Macworld

Apple fixes iPhone SMS flaw

Vulnerability in iPhone software allowed hackers to take control of the device via an SMS message, as demonstrated at Black Hat.

Read the full story here, from CNET News.com

Apple releases iPhone OS 3.0.1 with SMS patch

Apple on Friday released iPhone firmware v3.0.1, following reports of a security vulnerability involving SMS messaging. The bug, exposed at the recent Black Hat security conference, allowed maliciously-crafted text messages to remotely disable or control an iPhone....



Read the full story here, from MacNN | The Macintosh News Network

FCC to probe rural gaps in US phone availability

The FCC will consider the limited rural availability of products like the iPhone as it explores the merits of exclusive American cellphone contracts, an interview reveals. "There are markets in the country where if you wanted an iPhone, if you wanted a Pre, you just couldnít get it -- from anyone," according to FCC chairman Julius Genachowski. "So one question is, is that consistent with broad c...



Read the full story here, from MacNN | The Macintosh News Network

HTC sees decline from Android rivals, iPhone

Taiwan's HTC on Friday overturned positive expectations and said it now believes its revenue will decline by a small single digit percentage this year. It had previously expected revenue to climb by 10 percent but changed its view after a lack of large-scale orders, phone delays and poor sales in its key Chinese market. The revised forecast shows HTC's once-rapid growth stunting as it had grown ...



Read the full story here, from MacNN | The Macintosh News Network

Apple releases iPhone OS 3.0.1

Apple has just released iPhone OS 3.0.1 via iTunes...

Read the full story here, from MacDailyNews

China iPhone pictures posted on news site

A Chinese news Web site Friday posted pictures that it claimed showed the iPhone model being tested for release in China.



Read the full story here, from Macworld

Apple, the App Store just isn't you

When it comes to numbers, the App Store is unquestionably a success. But Dan Moren thinks there's a deeper flaw in it, one that's hard to reconcile with Apple's long-standing image of thinking different.



Read the full story here, from Macworld

Classic cyberpunk adventure game is iPhone-bound

Beneath a Steel Sky, a classic adventure game first released 15 years ago, will be one of the first offerings from Revolution Pocket, the new mobile game-focused division of Revolution Software.



Read the full story here, from Macworld

FCC to investigate markets where iPhone is not available

While it surveys exclusive contracts like the relationship between AT&T and Apple, the Federal Communications Commission will also look into concerns that customers in rural areas can't access limited products like the iPhone.

Read the full story here, from AppleInsider

Apple, Nokia and BlackBerry Encouraging GPS Smartphone Growth

Worldwide GPS smartphone shipments are expected to grow by 34 percent this year, compared to 2008 numbers, says a new report from Strategy Analytics. Mobile navigation services from Apple, Nokia and BlackBerry-maker Research In Motion are a major contributing factor.
- GPS smartphone adoption is on the rise, according to a July 29 report from Strategy Analytics. Worldwide shipments of GPS-equipped smartphones are expected to increase by 34 percent this year, compared to 2008 numbers, which would boost the number of units shipped from 57 million units to 77 mil...

Read the full story here, from eWEEK Technology News

Images of the Chinese iPhone Posted Online?

Images of the Chinese iPhone have been posted online by Sina.com.cn

Read the full story here, from iClarified - Apple News

Ahmadinejad denies rift with supreme leader

Conservatives cast doubt on president's loyalty to Ayatollah Ali Khamenei after dispute over appointment of controversial vice-president

President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad lashed out at critics within his own hardline camp on Friday, denying any rift with Iran's supreme leader, whom he said was like a father.

The bitter feud with conservatives has shaken Ahmadinejad's government at a time when he is already trying to fend off a challenge from the other end of the political spectrum â€" the pro-reform opposition, which says his victory in 12 June presidential elections was fraudulent and his government illegitimate.

Conservatives have cast doubt on Ahmadinejad's loyalty to supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei because of a dispute over a controversial vice-president Ahmadinejad appointed two weeks ago. Hardliners were outraged by the appointment of Esfandiar Rahim Mashai because he once made comments saying Iranians and Israelis were friends.

Khamenei ordered the dismissal of the vice-president, but Ahmadinejad stalled for days, trying to keep Mashai, who is his in-law and a close associate. His defiance further goaded hardliners. The president finally obeyed the dismissal order, but he promptly appointed Mashai as his chief of staff.

In a speech today in the northeastern city of Mashhad, Ahmadinejad said "some in recent days have portrayed the relationship between the leader and the administration as in doubt, they tried to imply distance and rift".

"What they do not understand is that the relationship between us and the supreme leader goes beyond politics and administration. It is based on kindness, on ideology, it is like that of a father and son," he said in the speech, parts of which were aired on state TV.

He said the attempts by "ill-wishers" would yield no results, adding, "this path with be shut in the face of devils".

Hardliners have repeatedly warned Ahmadinejad that his legitimacy will be in doubt if he does not follow the supreme leader, who stands at the top of Iran's clerical leadership and has the final word on all state issues.

Ahmadinejad has feuded with fellow conservatives in the past, particularly because some in his camp believe he gives top posts to close associates rather than spreading out power among the camp's factions. The fight over Mashai could point to an attempt by hardliners to dictate the makeup of Ahmadinejad's new government, due to be announced in early August.

In a sermon at Tehran's main Friday prayers service, a senior ultra-conservative cleric told Ahmadinejad he must work with parliament on the formation of the next parliament, a veiled demand he take the views of hardliners there into account.

"Before naming individuals for ministries, the government and parliament must co-ordinate," Ayatollah Ahmad Jannati said.

Meanwhile, the government and hardliners lashed out at criticism over alleged abuse of protesters and activists arrested in the heavy crackdown after the disputed election. On Thursday, thousands of opposition supporters held a memorial service in the Behesht-e Zahra cemetery on Tehran's outskirts to commemorate those who died in the suppression.

In his sermon, Jannati blamed the opposition â€" and implicitly its leader Mir Hossein Mousavi â€" for the deaths, saying they goaded people into protests.

"Who killed them? If you hadn't provoked young people, would they have been killed?" Jannati said. "You go to their memorial service, but you should be asking their forgiveness. Those instigators who designed the plan are the ones who did this."

Protests erupted after Mousavi claimed to have won the election and said Ahmadinejad's victory was fraudulent. Hundreds of thousands took to the streets in the days following the election, until police, the elite Revolutionary Guards and the Basij militia unleashed their crackdown. Hundreds were arrested, and the number still imprisoned remains unclear.



Read the full story here, from Guardian Unlimited

Apple Releases iPhone OS 3.0.1 to Address SMS Security Vulnerability

Apple today released iPhone OS 3.0.1, addressing an SMS security vulnerability disclosed at yesterday's Black Hat cybersecurity conference in Las Vegas. The release of iPhone OS 3.0.1 has been expected since a spokesperson for UK iPhone carrier O2 c...

Read the full story here, from MacRumors : Mac News and Rumors

Product News: Roadee Navigation System Now Comes With Voice Guidance

The makers of Roadee, an Openstreetmap based navigation system for the iPhone, announced an update to their app of Friday. The most significant new feature is voice guidance.

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Read the full story here, from The Mac Observer

Analysis: Apple’s Cash on Hand vs. Microsoft

I thought it would be interesting to compare Microsoft's cash on hand (and short term securities) to Apple's. Over the last few years, Microsoft hasn't fared well compared to Apple.

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Read the full story here, from The Mac Observer

Steve Ballmer calls Apple’s Mac market share growth a ‘rounding error’

Speaking to a group of market analysts this week, Microsoft Chief Executive Steve Ballmer...

Read the full story here, from MacDailyNews

Crash Bandicoot Nitro Kart 3D for iPhone

It's been a year since Crash Bandicoot raced on to our iPhones at the App Store's launch. How does the game hold up, given all the other racing titles now available for download? Pretty well, Chris Barylick says.



Read the full story here, from Macworld

O2 says iPhone SMS patch imminent

Apple's U.K. wireless partner, O2, says that a patch to fix a security hole in the iPhone's SMS software is due shortly.



Read the full story here, from Macworld

Rogers extends iPhone 3GS promos following shortages

Canadian carrier Rogers has extended a number of key iPhone 3GS promotions -- originally set to expire today -- until September 15th, both under its own branding and that of Fido. A $500 subsidy is available to people who bought an iPhone 3G between July 11th and September 30th of last year, and also spend at least $100 per month. Eligible shoppers are penalized with a one-year contract extensio...



Read the full story here, from MacNN | The Macintosh News Network

Review: Comcast mobile App for iPhone

With its limitations, the Comcast mobile App is best suited for Comcast customers whose daily duties require constant access to their Comcast.net e-mail and Digital Voice message.



Read the full story here, from Macworld

Images of Chinese iPhone Surface, Regulatory Approval Granted

Engadget reports that a China-specific iPhone carrying model number A1324 received a five-year approval from China's State Radio Regulatory Commission on May 7th, opening the door for the company to launch the iPhone there. Separately, PC World note...

Read the full story here, from MacRumors : Mac News and Rumors

Chinese iPhone 3GS spotted in testing?

An iPhone running on China Unicom's network has been seen in a set of photos (since edited) that appears to confirm reports of the carrier nearing a deal to carry the device in the Asian country. The handset shown by Sina appears to be a stock 16GB iPhone 3GS in most respects but, beyond showing "China Unicom" as the carrier identifier, shows Chinese characters on the back and makes a reference t...



Read the full story here, from MacNN | The Macintosh News Network

Ahmadinejad denies rift with leader

Conservatives cast doubt on president's loyalty to Ayatollah Ali Khamenei after dispute over appointment of controversial vice-president

President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad lashed out at critics within his own hardline camp on Friday, denying any rift with Iran's supreme leader, whom he said was like a father.

The bitter feud with conservatives has shaken Ahmadinejad's government at a time when he is already trying to fend off a challenge from the other end of the political spectrum â€" the pro-reform opposition, which says his victory in 12 June presidential elections was fraudulent and his government illegitimate.

Conservatives have cast doubt on Ahmadinejad's loyalty to supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei because of a dispute over a controversial vice-president Ahmadinejad appointed two weeks ago. Hardliners were outraged by the appointment of Esfandiar Rahim Mashai because he once made comments saying Iranians and Israelis were friends.

Khamenei ordered the dismissal of the vice-president, but Ahmadinejad stalled for days, trying to keep Mashai, who is his in-law and a close associate. His defiance further goaded hardliners. The president finally obeyed the dismissal order, but he promptly appointed Mashai as his chief of staff.

In a speech today in the northeastern city of Mashhad, Ahmadinejad said "some in recent days have portrayed the relationship between the leader and the administration as in doubt, they tried to imply distance and rift".

"What they do not understand is that the relationship between us and the supreme leader goes beyond politics and administration. It is based on kindness, on ideology, it is like that of a father and son," he said in the speech, parts of which were aired on state TV.

He said the attempts by "ill-wishers" would yield no results, adding, "this path with be shut in the face of devils".

Hardliners have repeatedly warned Ahmadinejad that his legitimacy will be in doubt if he does not follow the supreme leader, who stands at the top of Iran's clerical leadership and has the final word on all state issues.

Ahmadinejad has feuded with fellow conservatives in the past, particularly because some in his camp believe he gives top posts to close associates rather than spreading out power among the camp's factions. The fight over Mashai could point to an attempt by hardliners to dictate the makeup of Ahmadinejad's new government, due to be announced in early August.

In a sermon at Tehran's main Friday prayers service, a senior ultra-conservative cleric told Ahmadinejad he must work with parliament on the formation of the next parliament, a veiled demand he take the views of hardliners there into account.

"Before naming individuals for ministries, the government and parliament must co-ordinate," Ayatollah Ahmad Jannati said.

Meanwhile, the government and hardliners lashed out at criticism over alleged abuse of protesters and activists arrested in the heavy crackdown after the disputed election. On Thursday, thousands of opposition supporters held a memorial service in the Behesht-e Zahra cemetery on Tehran's outskirts to commemorate those who died in the suppression.

In his sermon, Jannati blamed the opposition â€" and implicitly its leader Mir Hossein Mousavi â€" for the deaths, saying they goaded people into protests.

"Who killed them? If you hadn't provoked young people, would they have been killed?" Jannati said. "You go to their memorial service, but you should be asking their forgiveness. Those instigators who designed the plan are the ones who did this."

Protests erupted after Mousavi claimed to have won the election and said Ahmadinejad's victory was fraudulent. Hundreds of thousands took to the streets in the days following the election, until police, the elite Revolutionary Guards and the Basij militia unleashed their crackdown. Hundreds were arrested, and the number still imprisoned remains unclear.



Read the full story here, from Guardian Unlimited

Product News: Safe and Cheap File Storage for Mac Users

360Works announced the launch of 360Works SafetyNet on Friday. This utility is an automated offsite backup plugin designed specifically for FileMaker Server solutions.

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Read the full story here, from The Mac Observer

TMO Appearances: Jeff Gamet to Speak at the Denver InDesign User Group Tuesday

The Mac Observer's own Jeff Gamet will be presenting at the Denver InDesign User Group meeting on Tuesday, August 4. Jeff will be discussing the secret lives of fonts, tips for avoiding font headaches, dealing with font management, and more.

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Read the full story here, from The Mac Observer

Microsoft’s Office 2008 for Mac SP2 kills cross-platform file compatibility

Various sources, including Microsoft, indicate that PC created Open XML formated...

Read the full story here, from MacDailyNews

New China Unicom iPhone model, sans Wi-Fi, given approval

Reports of regulatory approval of a new model of the iPhone in China seem to confirm that Apple's hardware will appear on the China Unicom network, and also suggest that a new model was created for the country of over 1 billion.

Read the full story here, from AppleInsider

Speck intros new CandyShell case colors for iPhone

Speck has added to its line of CandyShell hard-cases for the iPhone with the release of five new two-tone color combos. Each CandyShell case features a light-weight design with a hard shell outside and a rubberized interior, to offer extra shock absorption while protecting against scraps and scratches from everyday use. With the new color combos users can now choose from BubbleMaker Pink, BatWing ...



Read the full story here, from MacNN | The Macintosh News Network

iPhone 3G catches fire in Europe, burns car seat

An iPhone 3G in Europe has reportedly caught fire while sitting on the passenger seat of a personís car, according to iPhoneclub.nl. The owner of the iPhone Pieter, a man living in the Dutch city of Leiden, reportedly returned to his car after leaving it unattended for a few minutes and discovered that his iPhone had caught on fire and completely destroyed his passengerís seat. When he left the iP...



Read the full story here, from MacNN | The Macintosh News Network

Hijacking iPhones and other smart devices using SMS

No user interaction necessary

Black Hat Researchers have uncovered a bevy of vulnerabilities in smart phones made by multiple vendors, including one in Apple's iPhone that could allow an attacker to execute malicious code without requiring the victim to take any action at all.…



Read the full story here, from Reg Hardware: Product News and Gadget Reviews from The Register - Mac

Guitar Rock Tour - launch trailer

Direct link here (thanks Nintendofan!)


Sponsored Topics: Guitar Rock Tour - Guitar - IPhone - Music -

Read the full story here, from Go Nintendo

Apple Posts Anti-Jailbreak Support Document

Apple has posted a support document warning users not to jailbreak due to adverse issues experienced by customers

Read the full story here, from iClarified - Apple News

Thursday, July 30, 2009

SMS, other hacks for iPhone shown at Black Hat

A flaw in the iPhone's operating software that enables attackers to control any iPhone by sending special SMS messages to the phone was revealed today, sources say. The software hole was demonstrated by researchers Charlie Miller and Colin Mulliner at the Black Hat conference in Las Vegas. The flaw could be used by a hacker to make calls, steal data, send text messages, power-down the device and o...



Read the full story here, from MacNN | The Macintosh News Network

iWeb Themes 5.0 offers 10 templates with each theme

iPresentee has released v5.0 of its iWeb Themes suite, used to add new themes to Apple's iWeb application for website development. The latest version brings five new themes to the suite, extending the collection to 45 themes total. The new themes are called Amber, Flowered, Blue-Black, Claret and Free-liver. Each theme in the suite consists of 10 different page templates....



Read the full story here, from MacNN | The Macintosh News Network

Experts find iPhone text-message security flaw

A pair of security experts announced a vulnerability in the iPhone today that allows a hacker to take control of an iPhone through an SMS text message attack. Cybersecurity researchers Charlie Miller and Collin Mulliner explained the security hole at the...

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Sponsored Topics: iPhone - CharlieMiller - Vulnerability - Apple -

Read the full story here, from SFGate: Business & Technology

Apple Offers AppleCare to Canadian iPhone Customers

Apple is now offering its AppleCare Protection Plan to Canadian iPhone customers.

Read the full story here, from iClarified - Apple News

In a roomful of Macs, Ballmer promises ‘really amazing’ non-Apple PC hardware coming this Christmas

So what does Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer do when he faces a room of press and financial analysts toting a bunch of Macs?

Read the full story here, from MacDailyNews

No joke: 'Funny or Die' coming to iPhone

An agreement with a content platform provider spells out an iPhone future for comedic video site Funny or Die.

Read the full story here, from CNET News.com

Microsoft reworks mobile strategy after tough year

The president of Microsoft's Entertainment and Devices division, Robbie Bach, told several Wall Street analysts that the company is in the process of reworking its Windows Mobile strategy following a "challenging year," according to Betanews. Despite increasing unit shipments, the platform has continued to lose market share against competitors such as BlackBerrys and the iPhone....



Read the full story here, from MacNN | The Macintosh News Network

Anti-natal

Why do some men just not get birth-partner etiquette? No, it's not OK to stand in the delivery room downloading apps on to your iPhone

I am incredibly annoyed with my friend, X. That is not his real initial; I am at least going to offer him a disguise, although passive-aggressively I am going to quote him so faithfully that he will know it's him.

If I thought he was alone in any of these thoughts, I wouldn't mention it; it's only because I suspect him of being the mouthpiece of debonair non-parenthood that I want to kick his head in.

So anyway, we were talking about my birth plans, which were that S, my sister, would look after T, while me and C went to hospital. I was complaining because S was going away for a weekend, but in fairness, it was 10 days before, and I wasn't that worried about it. But X said, "Well, you can't expect her to cancel her whole month, only the one day," and I said, "Not exactly, X, only 5% of babies actually arrive on their due dates. You have to have some leeway," and he said, "What about C?", and I said, "C will be with me. C is my birth partner. That's how it works these days." "Huh," said X, as if I was being incredibly high-maintenance. "I'm not being high-maintenance. That is how it works." "Huh," he said again, as if I'd just rung C from the hairdressers and made him come home from work to pick me up, because it was windy.

I have more misgivings about birth-partner protocol than I let on. Three months prior to each of these childbirths, C has started to mutter "amusingly" about how he'd rather not be my birth partner; he'd rather be in the pub with a cigar. It's always in front of other people; perhaps someone from Relate can write in, with a methodological formula for the "awkward" conversation your boyfriend raises in public, so you can't make it any more awkward by replying. I imagine you're meant to stash it for later, and raise it in a relaxed way when you're both alone. I do not have the maturity nor, for that matter, the memory, for that tactic.

So anyway, I always do reply in public. I always say, "Go to the pub, then! I'll get someone else," and he always rolls his eyes, as if he has made an hilarious joke, which I have taken the wrong way, like in the Madness song. In fact neither of us is joking. He is fine in a birth scenario, but I don't agree with the orthodoxy here: that it's so momentous, only the father will do. The person you want there is the one who has your best interests at heart but can also, through experience or expertise, be of practical assistance, and moreover, isn't going to do anything stupid, like look bored or eat all the way through, or download an app for his iPhone or be too busy texting when the baby is born to symbolically cut the umbilical cord.

That is pretty much a litany of what the birth-partner father does. They make the umbilical faux pas so often it should be called the symbilical cord, and it will symbolically encompass all your arguments for the next five years. "Yeah, but . . ." continued X, "Why couldn't C just look after T while you went to the hospital, and join you there when the babysitter or someone had arrived." "X, nobody goes to hospital to give birth alone. It would be like trying to get your appendix out and clear Customs at the same time. Even a pregnant murderer would arrive with some kind of case worker." "Well, why don't you just take T with you and leave him in an anteroom?" "Yeah, that'd be fun for him, and not at all traumatic. To be left in a hospital room on his own, while both his parents disappear and he can hear one or maybe both of them screaming."



Read the full story here, from Guardian Unlimited

iPhone apps: WriteRoom, Steel Guitar, Daily Tracker

WriteRoom ($5) can be used to write and organize notes. The software uses a simple black and white interface and includes support for both landscape and portrait keyboards. WriteRoom also features the ability to share files over a WiFi connection and sync files to WriteRoom.ws. The WriteRoom syncing feature is still considered a beta and is not recommended for sensitive data as security is relativ...



Read the full story here, from MacNN | The Macintosh News Network

Lextech Global Services Works With Lextech Labs and Axis Communications to Provide Video Infrastructure for iPhoneDevCamp 3

LISLE, Ill., July 30 /PRNewswire/ -- Lextech Global Services, leading provider of custom iPhone app development services, today announced that it is working with Lextech Labs, world class video surveillance application company, and Axis Communications, the global leader in the network video market, to provide the video infrastructure for iPhoneDevCamp

read more



Read the full story here, from FreshNews.com: Computers/Internet/Hardware/Software

Review: ESPN ScoreCenter for iPhone

ESPN's app for keeping up on the latest scores from the world of sports makes a solid debut on the App Store. But Sportacular and an updated SportsTap remain your best choices for finding out the score.



Read the full story here, from Macworld

Two-year-old iPhone nano patent draws headlines again

A dated patent filing for an iPhone nano concept has again garnered attention and inspired speculation in numerous media outlets, after the concept re-appeared in new Australian documents.

Read the full story here, from AppleInsider

Unofficial iPhone app store nears $250,000 in revenue

The Cydia Store is quickly approaching $250,000 in revenue following its opening just over four months ago, according to ModMyi. The third-party app portal for jailbroken iPhones has drawn more than 50,000 purchases. Jay Freeman, Cydia's creator, claims several developers have made over $10,000 in the first week of sales, without going through Apple's App Store....



Read the full story here, from MacNN | The Macintosh News Network

40% of Citrix employees choose Mac for home and work

40 percent of Citrix System employees purchased a Mac when given $2100 towards a new computer for the company's Bring Your Own Computer to Work program. The strategy was an attempt to cut costs incurred in the IT department and aimed to increase employee satisfaction. Workers were allowed to chose whichever computer they wished to use for both work and personal use. Of the 400 employees that parti...



Read the full story here, from MacNN | The Macintosh News Network

Games: Warhammer for Mac Announced for Fall Release

Mythic Entertainment and Electronic Arts announced Thursday that a Mac client for Warhammer Online: Age of Reckoning will be released in the Fall of 2009. The massively multiplayer online Roleplaying Game (MMO), commonly called simply WAR, has been among the more successful competitors to Blizzard Entertainment's smash sensation World of Warcraft, but has heretofore been available only on Windows.

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Read the full story here, from The Mac Observer

Ballmer promises ‘really amazing’ non-Apple PC hardware coming this Christmas

So what does Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer do when he faces a room of press and financial analysts toting a bunch of Macs?

Read the full story here, from MacDailyNews

Apple cautions iPhone users about jailbreaking

Apple published a support article about the potential problems that users might run into with their jailbroken iPhone.

Read the full story here, from CNET News.com

Apple: Time Capsule 2TB

Apple quietly released a 2TB Time Capsule at $499 and dropped the price of the 1TB Time Capsule to $299.

Read the full story here, from MacInTouch

Power Manager gives you more control over your Mac's schedule

Power Manager gives you many more options than Energy Saver for controlling when your Mac is awake, asleep, or shut down. It also lets you schedule actions such as logging out and switching to the login screen.



Read the full story here, from Macworld

Top 10 iPhone annoyances -- and how to fix them

Even the iPhone isn't perfect. PC World counts down the top 10 iPhone annoyances and what you can do about them.



Read the full story here, from Macworld

Opinion: For gamers, waiting's better than Boot Camp

Playing games via Boot Camp is certainly an option for Mac gamers who don't want to wait for titles to be ported over from the Windows platform. But it's not a very good one, Peter Cohen says.



Read the full story here, from Macworld

Ballmer: larger threat from Apple, Linux

Microsoft chief Steve Ballmer today told those gathered at his company's financial analyst meeting that he fully anticipates stiffer competition, particularly from incumbent rivals like Apple, Linux and evetually Chrome OS. He contended that it was only natural for an OS as dominant as Windows to face a threat and maintained that Microsoft "deserves competition" to remain healthy. In spite of pa...



Read the full story here, from MacNN | The Macintosh News Network

iPhone boosts Softbank revenue, NTT DoCoMo slides

Japan's largest cellphone carriers experienced contrasting performance in the first fiscal quarter, as the leader NTT DoCoMo reported a slide in net profit by 15 percent to Y147.38 billion (~$1.54 billion USD), according to the Wall Street Journal. Softbank, meanwhile, surprised analysts with a 41 percent jump in profit to Y27.38 (~$286 million USD)....



Read the full story here, from MacNN | The Macintosh News Network

Leaked iPhone Bezel Actually for Creative Zii Egg?


Back in May, an image of an "Apple iPhone 3Gen 2009" bezel appeared on Chinese parts supplier websites. This led many to believe that the new iPhone would adopt a slightly different design with a higher earpiece. As it turns out, it appears...

Read the full story here, from MacRumors : Mac News and Rumors

Product News: Hog Bay Software Releases WriteRoom.iPhone 2.0

Hog Bay Software released WriteRoom.iPhone 2.0 on Thursday. This app allows users to easily write and take notes on their iPhone.

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Read the full story here, from The Mac Observer

How-To: Moving iPhone Apps between iPhones Bought with Different Accounts

It is possible to copy an iPhone app, purchased with one iTunes account to another iPhone linked to a different iTunes account. Without paying for it again. Here's how to do it.

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Read the full story here, from The Mac Observer

AT&T: iPhone OS 3.0 prompts increase in Wi-Fi connections

AT&T saw nearly 15 million users connect to its Wi-Fi network last quarter...

Read the full story here, from MacDailyNews

Foxconn suicide over 4G iPhone prototype spotlights China counterfeiting

"One week after the apparent suicide of a Chinese factory worker accused of stealing...

Read the full story here, from MacDailyNews

VoiceCentral iPhone developer frustrated with Apple

Apple pulled VoiceCentral from the App Store, saying it duplicates features on the iPhone, says developer. The app had been available for the past four months.

Read the full story here, from CNET News.com

Warhammer Online: Age of Reckoning comes to the Mac

Warhammer Online: Age of Reckoning, the MMORPG, is now available for the Mac as a beta version and will be released this fall.



Read the full story here, from Macworld

CEA: Apple's not exhibiting at CES

Apple isn't exhibiting at CES 2010, the CEA confirmed, quashing an earlier assertion from a Wall Street Journal blogger.



Read the full story here, from Macworld

iPhone 3GS sales above expectations, nearing 7m?

A report from the Kaufman Bros. research firm is said to indicate a sales shift towards higher-end iPhone models, including the iPhone 3GS, and specifically the $299 32GB model. While this should be beneficial to Apple's revenue, gross margin and EPS, the analyst suggests that the company may have expected users to be more enticed by the lower price of the iPhone 3G, and deliberately held back on ...



Read the full story here, from MacNN | The Macintosh News Network

WriteRoom.iPhone 2.0 Released

WriteRoom is a distraction free writing environment. Unlike Notes, WriteRoom provides a clean interface and tether free syncing.

Read the full story here, from iClarified - Apple News

Ganging up with Google Android against Apple's iPhone

Android could become a strong contender to the iPhone throne if for no other reason than many competitors like Motorola desperately need Android to succeed.

Read the full story here, from CNET News.com

Apple releases 2TB Time Capsule for $499

Company has boosted the hard drive capacity on the Time Capsule, which does double-duty as an 802.11n router and NAS drive.

Read the full story here, from CNET News.com

Rename open files

Use a long-standing Mac OS feature to rename a file even while you're actively editing that file.



Read the full story here, from Macworld

Solutions to 3 perplexing Mac printer problems

Tips on how to deal with disappearing printers and other woes

Read the full story here, from ITWorld Canada: Enterprise Business Applications

Review: B&N Bookstore for iPhone

This app from the book retailing has a lot going for it. But how does it measure up to Amazon's mobile offering?



Read the full story here, from Macworld

AT&T sees big increase in Wi-Fi connections following iPhone 3.0

AT&T saw nearly 15 million users connect to its Wi-Fi network last quarter -- a 41 percent increase over the previous quarter -- thanks, in part, to the release of iPhone 3.0, which allowed auto-authentication on the wireless carrier's 20,000 hotspots.

Read the full story here, from AppleInsider

Kaufman reports iPhone 3GS sales above expectations

A report from the Kaufman Bros. research firm is said to indicate a sales shift towards higher-end iPhone models, including the iPhone 3GS, and specifically the $299 32GB model. While this should be beneficial to Apple's revenue, gross margin and EPS, Kaufman suggests that the company may have expected users to be more enticed by the lower price of the iPhone 3G, and deliberately held back on 3GS ...



Read the full story here, from MacNN | The Macintosh News Network

iPhone SMS Security Vulnerability to Be Disclosed Today

Forbes reports that cybersecurity researchers plan to publicize today at the Black Hat conference in Las Vegas a security vulnerability in the iPhone SMS messaging system that reportedly would allow hackers to in theory "take over every iPhone in the...

Read the full story here, from MacRumors : Mac News and Rumors

Jumsoft launches new Numbers spreadsheet templates

Jumsoft has launched Numbers Templates, a new collection of templates for Apple's spreadsheet software. The bundle is meant for both home and professional users, and handles recurring situations and calculations. The initial set includes 10 templates, such as Dinner Planner, Home Inventory, Invoice, Loan Comparison and Grocery List....



Read the full story here, from MacNN | The Macintosh News Network

Product News: A Turtle Shell For Your Mac Notebook

RadTech announced the immediate availability of STM Turtle Hard Shell Laptop Sleeve on Thursday. This horizontal-loading STM Turtle protects notebooks from impacts, soiling and scratches within a rigid, protective shell.

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Read the full story here, from The Mac Observer

WSJ Falsely Confirms Apple's CES Attendance?

Engadget is reporting that the information published by the WSJ in regards to Apple's CES attendance is false.

Read the full story here, from iClarified - Apple News

Apple Fans Prepare for WAR with Mac Version of Warhammer Online: Age of Reckoning

Mythic Entertainment™, an Electronic Arts Inc. (NASDAQ:ERTS) studio, today announced that the critically acclaimed MMORPG, Warhammer® Online: Age of Reckoning® (WAR), is being developed

read more



Read the full story here, from FreshNews.com: Computers/Internet/Hardware/Software

Speck Mixes New Flavor Combinations for CandyShell Cases For iPhone 3G and 3GS

Speck’s designers are at it again. Not content with “just another case” for “just another iPhone,” the team has crafted a whole new spin on the company’s popular

read more



Read the full story here, from FreshNews.com: Computers/Internet/Hardware/Software

Apple Updates Time Capsule to 1 TB and 2 TB Capacities [Updated]


Apple this morning quietly updated its Time Capsule combination wireless router and network-attached storage drive to double the models' capacities at the same price points as the previous models: 1 TB for $299 and 2 TB for $499. While Apple...

Read the full story here, from MacRumors : Mac News and Rumors

Apple intros 2TB Time Capsule, drops 1TB price

Apple has quietly introduced an upgraded Time Capsule drive, which can now store as much as 2TB. The new capacity trumps an earlier 1TB option, which has been reduced in price to $299. The 2TB model is priced at $499....



Read the full story here, from MacNN | The Macintosh News Network

iPhone SMS bug to be attacked at Black Hat

Apple has less than a day left to patch a bug in it's iPhone software...

Read the full story here, from MacDailyNews

Update: Missing Sync for iPhone 2.0.2

The iPhone data synchronization utility adds support for saving voice memos and individual voice messages.

Read the full story here, from MacInTouch

Report: Xserve

Apple Drive Modules

Read the full story here, from MacInTouch

iPhone actually good at making calls shock

Smart phones tested for dumb functions

Testing specialists Broadband Testing have turned their attention to what remains the killer app for mobile phones - the ability to make phone calls - and has discovered that some smart phones are not so bright.…



Read the full story here, from Reg Hardware: Product News and Gadget Reviews from The Register - iPod

Apple Upgrades the Time Capsule to 2TB

Apple has quietly upgraded the capacity of the Time Capsule from 500MB and 1TB to 1TB and 2TB options.

Read the full story here, from iClarified - Apple News

Apple CEO Steve Jobs invited to keynote CES 2010 in January; no response given so far

Gary Shapiro is chief executive of the Consumer Electronics Association...

Read the full story here, from MacDailyNews

Comic Con 09: Hands on with Smith Micro’s Anime Studio Pro 6

FROM GAMERTELL - Gamertell got an exclusive look at Smith Micro’s new Anime Studio Pro 6…
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Verizon’s Palm Pre - iPhone’s Achilles’ heel?

FROM GADGETELL - It is on.  In their quarterly announcement today, Verizon offered up this gem: “early next year” the Palm Pre will be on their network.  Forget the lame Palm Pre ads.  The Palm Pre is headed to Verizon-land and may change the phone landscape as we know it. Palm has taken… MORE »

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3 free, browser-based, text-based RPGs worth gaining experience in

FROM GAMERTELL - Gamertell briefly looks at Kingdom of Loathing, Muffins! and Legend of the Green Dragon, three free, online, primarily text RPGs that offer great experiences to both novices and advanced players searching for a new (free) adventure.
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Popular technology industry news for the week of 7-19-2009



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Casual Friday: Update for July 18-24, 2009

FROM GAMERTELL - Gamertell’s Casual Friday casual game update for July 18-24, 2009 includes Pure Hidden (PC, Mac), Farm Frenzy 3 (PC), Passport to Perfume (PC, Mac) and many other quality casual games.
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